GSoC 2016 | OMR and more projects

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GSoC 2016 | OMR and more projects

jguo
Hi everyone!

I'm Janet Guo, currently a Computer Science grad student at Umass-Amherst, MA, USA. I was hoping to get some help narrowing down my list of projects.

I was raised a classically trained pianist and have been playing for more than a decade. My second major instrument is the violin. I've been composing music since my years as an undergrad student (I considered a major in music at one point) and I have a couple of young students looking to dabble in composition. As such, I've tried my hand at music notation software such as Sibelius and Finale, all with have shortcomings I've found increasingly frustrating. Recently, I've actually been toying with the idea of writing my own music notation software, so imagine the thrill I got when I was browsing GSoC and came across MuseScore (I can't believe it never occurred to me to look for an open-source alternative).

I took a look at the project list and was interested in most of the projects. It took me a bit of time to pare it down and I'm still not sure which one I should settle on. I would love some feedback in this area:

Projects from the list:
(1) OMR:
The OMR project may make the most sense because this was something I was looking into before I even came across MuseScore. When I was thinking about writing my own software, one of the first capabilities I wanted (beyond the basic notation) was OMR.
I was looking at Audiveris, which is an open source tool for OMR that even comes with a trainable neural network (which would be really handy for scanning hand-written music). Since Audiveris is written in Java and I have a bit of experience with neural nets, I could tune Audiveris's network if need be. Audiveris seems like it should work well with MuseScore (it exports files in MusicXML).

(2) Half/double durations
This would be a great feature! And I don't think it should be that difficult...

(3) Chord symbols playback

My own ideas:
(4) Automatic Music Theory Detection:
I have a lot of experience with music theory and sometimes teach it. A feature I would love to implement would be the ability for MuseScore to automatically recognize things like chord intervals and progression based on the nearest key signature.

(5) Integration with PD:
I've worked quite a bit with PureData (PD) and have a few different "improv machines" (as I call it) in PD which generate random melodies and harmonies. I sometimes have them running in the background and they'll sometimes generate a really lovely musical line I wish I could reproduce on paper.

(Note on my programming languages: Java is the language I consider myself an expert in, but I'm also quite familiar with C and C++. I haven't worked with Qt yet; However, since it's a framework that uses standard C++, I'm pretty sure it won't take me that long to pick up.)

Thank you for any and all feedback!
Janet
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Re: GSoC 2016 | OMR and more projects

lasconic
Administrator
Hi Janet,

Next, the deadline for GSoC student application is on march 25th, so you need to hurry up if you want to participate to GSoC.
Of course, you can also contribute to MuseScore development when you want!

Your own ideas are often the best ones so I will comment on these.

5/ Integration with PD is the way you describe it is probably more a PD project. If your PD patches could export MIDI or MusicXML then MuseScore could import them.

4/ I'm always interested to find out what MuseScore lacks for higher music education. It seems that the tools you describe could be useful to many. You should work further on this idea and be more specific on what music theory tasks MuseScore could help with.

lasconic

2016-03-23 2:32 GMT+04:00 jguo <[hidden email]>:
Hi everyone!

I'm Janet Guo, currently a Computer Science grad student at Umass-Amherst,
MA, USA. I was hoping to get some help narrowing down my list of projects.

I was raised a classically trained pianist and have been playing for more
than a decade. My second major instrument is the violin. I've been composing
music since my years as an undergrad student (I considered a major in music
at one point) and I have a couple of young students looking to dabble in
composition. As such, I've tried my hand at music notation software such as
Sibelius and Finale, all with have shortcomings I've found increasingly
frustrating. Recently, I've actually been toying with the idea of writing my
own music notation software, so imagine the thrill I got when I was browsing
GSoC and came across MuseScore (I can't believe it never occurred to me to
look for an open-source alternative).

I took a look at the project list and was interested in most of the
projects. It took me a bit of time to pare it down and I'm still not sure
which one I should settle on. I would love some feedback in this area:

Projects from the list:
(1) OMR:
The OMR project may make the most sense because this was something I was
looking into before I even came across MuseScore. When I was thinking about
writing my own software, one of the first capabilities I wanted (beyond the
basic notation) was OMR.
I was looking at Audiveris, which is an open source tool for OMR that even
comes with a trainable neural network (which would be really handy for
scanning hand-written music). Since Audiveris is written in Java and I have
a bit of experience with neural nets, I could tune Audiveris's network if
need be. Audiveris seems like it should work well with MuseScore (it exports
files in MusicXML).

(2) Half/double durations
This would be a great feature! And I don't think it should be that
difficult...

(3) Chord symbols playback

My own ideas:
(4) Automatic Music Theory Detection:
I have a lot of experience with music theory and sometimes teach it. A
feature I would love to implement would be the ability for MuseScore to
automatically recognize things like chord intervals and progression based on
the nearest key signature.

(5) Integration with PD:
I've worked quite a bit with PureData (PD) and have a few different "improv
machines" (as I call it) in PD which generate random melodies and harmonies.
I sometimes have them running in the background and they'll sometimes
generate a really lovely musical line I wish I could reproduce on paper.

(Note on my programming languages: Java is the language I consider myself an
expert in, but I'm also quite familiar with C and C++. I haven't worked with
Qt yet; However, since it's a framework that uses standard C++, I'm pretty
sure it won't take me that long to pick up.)

Thank you for any and all feedback!
Janet



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